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At Slumber Ease, our goal is to help you get the best possible sleep so you can live the life you want. This month we’re gathering more of the best resources and research to help you rest effectively.

Last month we looked into sleep supplements, found out about a woman who swallowed her engagement ring in her sleep, and discovered a U2 song is the most effective in the world for putting young children to sleep. You can learn more in our September Best Sleep Roundup.

Best Sleep Products:

If you enjoy the feeling of being held or hugged as you sleep, you’ll probably love the COMHO Weighted Blanket with Cooling Cotton. This blanket is designed to evenly fit your body and increase the time you spend in a deep sleep.

The COMHO blanket also shines in the materials category. These blankets make use of 100% natural cotton, making it more comfortable and breathable than many synthetic blankets. Nanoceramic beads reduce the noise from movement. A multi-layer design makes the blanket warm and durable, with advanced dewing techniques that can help you avoid cracking in the quilting.

For couples looking for a larger weighted blanket, the OMYSTYLE 15lb King Size weighted blanket may be ideal. This gigantic blanket provides light pressure and comes with a carry bag.

This blanket is made with a combination of 100% cotton and glass beads. The 7-layer design creates gentle pressure to encourage deeper, more restful sleep.

Sleep Science Roundup

sleepless woman​Working Americans are getting less sleep than they did just a decade ago, according to new research based on data from the National Health Interview Survey. Researchers found that the prevalence of inadequate sleep, defined as seven hours or less, increased from 30.9% in 2010 to 35.6% in 2018.

To make matters worse, the workers most affected were those in occupations that help save lives. Around half of police officers and health care workers get less than seven hours of sleep per night, with many getting as few five. Transportation workers such as truck drivers were also less likely to get sufficient sleep.

Struggling to maintain a healthy weight? Getting more sleep could help reduce your food cravings. Good sleep hygiene can lead to reduced hunger, as well as a reduced desire for sweet and salty foods.

Studies show that a single night of sleep deprivation changes the levels of your hunger and appetite hormones. When you are under-rested, your body craves extra calories that it wouldn’t if you had enough sleep.

Better Sleep in the News

A sleep doctor is helping the Washington Nationals chase the World Series title. Dr. Meeta Singh, a sleep expert based in Michigan, gives the Nationals detailed recommendations on every aspect of sleep, from the best times to travel after games for sleep to how to become more alert before night games. Players are encouraged to wear special orange-tinted glasses while on their cell phones late at night.

“It’s similar to how we make sleep schedules for astronauts,” she said in a recently published article.

The doctor sends the team a sleep schedule every two weeks with advice based on their travel schedule. Every tiny sleep improvement gives the team a slight edge in areas like reaction times and preventing injuries.

A new California law mandates later start times for students in middle and high school. Beginning in 2020, middle schools will begin no earlier than 8 a.m. and high schools will need to start no earlier than 8:30.

This comes after years of overwhelming evidence that teens’ performance in school is impaired by early wakeup times. Many adolescents experience biological changes that put them on a later circadian rhythm, making it more difficult to fall asleep at the necessary time to wake up well-rested for early classes.

Individual cities and school districts have implemented similar policies, but the California law is the first statewide response to the teen sleep epidemic. A recent study done with Seattle Public Schools students found that shifting start times forward by nearly an hour helped highs school students get 34 more minutes of sleep on average.

 

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